Posts filed under “Video”

Banned OSHA Films

Here’s a nice Labor Day themed story.

In 1980, the last year of Jimmy Carter’s administration, the Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) commissioned a series of three 30-minute films about worker safety.  These were real pro productions, with Studs Terkel as narrator on two of the productions.  In 1981, Reagan appointed 36-year old Florida construction executive Thorne G. Auchter, who proceeded to systematically dismantle the agency.  Evidently, the 3 films disturbed Thorne greatly, because OSHA issued a recall, threatening to withold OSHA funds from any organization that did not return their copies of the films, which were promptly destroyed.

But, a few union officials defied the ban and "stole" copies so they weren’t able to be returned.  Over the years, they would occasionally show them to their troops, using the fact they banned as a way to get them to watch the films, which have important messages about worker rights and workplace safety.  But, aside from these bootleg showings, the video disappeared.

PublicResource.Org got a note recently from Mark Catlan, a health and safety expert for one of the unions for the last 28 years (he actually started working for the union the year the film came out, and remembers his education director stealing a copy out of his office so it wouldn’t get returned).  A year ago, Mark decided the world needed to see these films, so he found 16-mm cannisters and made them available to us to transfer to DVCAM and then disk.

Making their public debut after 30 years are "Worker to Worker," "Can’t Take No More," and "The Story of OSHA."

Link to YouTube

The Story of OSHA

Can’t Take No More

Worker to Worker

 

 

Link to the Internet Archive:
http://www.archive.org/search.php?query=subject%3A%22public.resource.org%22%20AND%20subject%3A%22osha.gov%22%20AND%20mediatype%3Amovies

( http://tiny.cc/hdLvC )

Via Dave Farber’s Interesting People list

Category: Employment, Video

Bloggers versus MSM

Interesting discussion from the Denver Convention:

Category: Financial Press, Video, Weblogs

Gone Forecasting: Fishing for Economic Answers

CNBC’s Steve Liesman on "Unique insights on the credit crisis and the future of the banking system from a stream in Maine…"

I have a few words in this, along with my pal Scott Frew, and colleagues David Mordechai (Swiss Re) and David Kotok (Cumberland).

click for video

Fishing

via CNBC

Read More

Category: Credit, Derivatives, Economy, Video

SEC Proposal: Abandon US Accounting Rules

What this country really needs is less tranparency in earnings reports, and more wiggle room for corporate reporting:

click for video
Cox_sucker

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We are governed by utter idiots . . .


Similarities and Differences: A comparison of IFRS and US GAAP
Click for PDF

Ifrs_and_us_gaap

WSJ:

"The Securities and Exchange
Commission signaled the demise of U.S. accounting standards, kicking
off a process Wednesday that could ultimately require all publicly
listed American companies to follow an international model instead.

Introduced
in two steps, the shift could eventually cut costs for companies and
smooth cross-border investing. At the same time, investors worry it
will create confusion, especially during the transition. Other critics
worry that the international system offers too much wiggle room for
companies, compared with the more precise rules enshrined in U.S.
standards.

The SEC’s proposal would allow some large
multinational companies to report earnings according to international
accounting beginning in 2010. The SEC estimates at least 110 U.S.
companies would qualify based on their market capitalization, among
other factors. The agency also laid out a road map by which all U.S.
companies would switch to International Financial Reporting Standards,
or IFRS, beginning in 2014, at the expense of U.S. Generally Accepted
Accounting Principles, the guiding light of accountants for decades.

The proposals will be open for public comment for 60 days and could be finalized later this year."

Anything that artificially boosts earnings is great for America . . .

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Sources:
SEC Moves to Pull Plug On U.S. Accounting Standards
KARA SCANNELL and JOANNA SLATER
WSJ, August 28, 2008; Page A1
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB121985665095476825.html

SEC May Let Companies Abandon U.S. Accounting Rules
Jesse Westbrook
Bloomberg, Aug. 27 2008
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=newsarchive&sid=azXvW6B6aINg

Download SandD_07.pdf

Category: Corporate Management, Earnings, Taxes and Policy, Valuation, Video

I.O.U.S.A – A Nation in Debt

Since we first mentioned IOUSA in early August, a lot more clips have become available.

Part 1

Part 2

Part 3

Part 4

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Category: Credit, Video

CNBC: Shadow Fed/Economists Fishing Trip

Squawk Box will run a 4 part series on Grand Lake Stream trip this week. 4 Packages which Steve Liesman will wrap around, beginning at 7:15am, and then repeating throughout the week.  (I believe the full package will run sometime on Labor Day weekend)

The 1st installment of the Kansas City Shadow Fed/Maine Leen’s Lodge fishing trip will air Tuesday at about 7:15 am EST.

I had a long sit down with Steve  for part 2 and 3 — unshaven, unshowered, reeking of fish –  be happy its not broadcast in smell-o-vision.

It will be interesting to see what gets cut and what stays in  but you never know what ends up on the cutting room floor.

Tuesday – Friday

Part1: The forecast/results of the survey and an overall review of the trip

Part 2: fishing for answers to the credit crisis Part 1

Part 3: fishing for answers to the credit crisis Part 2

Part 4: The future of the banking system

Category: Media, Video

Feldstein: Low Rates May Not Boost U.S. Growth

Harvard University economist Martin Feldstein, a member of the committee that charts American business cycles, said the Federal Reserve cannot count on low interest rates to buoy economic growth.

"Lower interest rates are not going to get us anything more,” Feldstein, who retired in June as president of the National Bureau of Economic Research. The economy has really shown one sign after another of weakening.”

click for video
Martin_feldstein

(why this sometimes works with on a Mac and sometimes not is beyond me)

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Source:
Feldstein Says Low Rates May Not Boost U.S. Growth
Anthony Massucci and Kathleen Hays
Bloomberg, Aug. 21 2008
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=newsarchive&sid=aOSuPYNhx2bo

Category: Economy, Fixed Income/Interest Rates, Video

Take A Load Off Fannie

Interesting juxtaposition!

Hat tip:  A.Deluca

Category: Credit, Real Estate, Video

Political Futures Markets on CNBC

How funny is this?

Cashing in on the Race:  The Intrade political futures market shows shares of Barack Obama has gone up nearly four points, with CNBC’s Scott Cohn   

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click for video
Critic_intrade

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One correction to the video: Intrade did actually have Biden as the top Veep pick

Category: Markets, Politics, Video

With celebrations set to kick off in Denver for the Democratic National Convention, the JOURNAL travels to Colorado where tough economic times are hitting suburban communities.

Click for Video:
Bill_moyers_denver

PBS and Bill Moyers go to the suburbs of Denver as the Democratic Convention is about to being to speak to "real people" — not Economists or Politicians:

Working Americans, and that’s most people, are experiencing the "big squeeze." In fact, they’re trying to survive one of the most profound social and economic changes in our history. The middle class is disappearing, facing a decline in standards of living. So you’d hope that the Democrats in Denver next week and the Republicans in St. Paul the following week would confront this crisis head on and not just serenade struggling families with a chorus of sympathetic but meaningless sound bites.

As wages stagnate, prices are soaring. Economists call this pain the "misery index." It’s a combination of the unemployment and inflation rates, and it’s what politicians have in mind when they ask, "Are you better off than you were four years ago?" Well, the misery index is the highest it’s been since George Bush’s father became president, seventeen years ago.

When it comes to feeling the misery index, however, you don’t go to the economists or the politicians. You go to where regular people live. And that’s what we have been doing on this broadcast for months now. We’ve seen how the mortgage crisis has devastated neighborhoods in Cleveland, how workers in Los Angeles are scrambling for a living wage, and how gas and food prices are choking the ability of food pantries to stave off hunger here in metropolitan New York.

This relates to our earlier discussion on Intersting stuff, Psychological Recessions.

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Source:
Denver Reality
BILL MOYERS
The Journal, August 22, 2008
http://www.pbs.org/moyers/journal/08222008/watch.html

Category: Economy, Employment, Video