Nobel Laurelates on the Economy

CNBC had three Nobel winners on Friday morn — Joseph Stiglitz, Robert Engle and Edmund Phelps — discussing Housing, Credit, and the state of the US economy.  It was terrific television, and showed how good the medium can be when it sets its mind on it.

Incidentally, longtime readers may remember our amusing encounter with Prof Robert Engle back in 2003. If you haven’t seen that, its definitely worth reading.

Joseph Stiglitz, 2001 Nobel Prize winner and Columbia University professor
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"The real important point from an economic perspective is the gap between the economy’s potential growth and its actual growth. And without a doubt, there’s a big gap. I think we’re probably in a recession. The real concern is how long, how deep. This is one of the worst—clearly going to be the worst … downturns since the Great Depression.”

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Robert Engle, Nobel Laureate Economist winner 2003 and New York University professor

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"I think that we’ve got a lot of strength that’s going to come out of the export sector, the technology sector. We’ve seen good earnings reports from some of them. They’re thriving on this weak dollar. It’s giving them a chance to sell goods all over the world. And I think that’s going to probably pull us out."

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Edmund Phelps, Nobel Prize winner in economics 2006

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"The rise of the unemployment rate has been mild, and it started from a very, very low level of 4.3 just ten or twelve months ago. By that metric, this is a mild downturn.”

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Related:
A funny thing happened to me on the way to the studio tonight . . .    http://bigpicture.typepad.com/comments/2003/11/a_funny_thing_h.html

Source:
Where’s the Economy Going? Nobel Winners Weigh In
CNBC.com 25 Apr 2008
http://www.cnbc.com/id/24313079/site/14081545

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Friday Evening Jazz: Dexter Gordon

FNJ has a guest DJ tonite: BondDaddy is in the house!

Dexter Gordon is one of the greatest tenor sax players. He had a strong tone and incredible sense of melody. Some players like Sonny Rollins and Joe Henderson had a slippery sense of time; their phrases speed up and slow down, moving within the rythm section’s accompaniment. Not Dexter. Dex’s time was rock solid, never wavering. The rythm section had to accompany his time.

Our_man_in_parisHis playing is incredibly melodic, easily followed by the listener. Ideas naturally morphed from one to the other, always following a logical pattern. However, he was also able to surprise listeners with a run into upper chordal extensions.

His playing provides a logical link between Parker and Coltrane. Dex used many ideas from Parker, but played them with a tone that was deep, bold and soulful.  His tone provides the link to Coltrane, who also favored a deep and rich tenor tone.

Gordon swung — and swung hard. If your feet are not tapping within 8 bars of his starting to play, you’re just not listening.

Our Man in Paris:
This be-bop session is a meeting between three of the most influential
musicians of the forties. The rhythms crackle, the solos fly; Our Man
In Paris is essential Dexter. A nice compilation of standards.

HomecomingHomecoming: Live at the Village Vanguard. Dex lived in Amsterdam for about 10 years, and this was the album be made when he came back. Very cool set. Woody Shaw is on Trumpet, and the two work really well together. THis is Dexter at the very top of his game (and probably one of the top 25 live jazz albums of all time).

He also starred in the Round Midnight, probably the best jazz movie ever made

Go:  Its been widely reported Gordon himself considered this his greatest achievement. Brimming with conviction and poise, Gordon’s gentle-giant sax carries itself with a sort of graceful edge that is difficult to emulate. Never has anyone made the diminished scale sound so musical.

Ballads

Ballads: This is a compilation of his ballads (duh), and he could play just beautifully on these. Gordon delivers his almost sleepy and smoke-filled solos with real grace. Some of the most romantic playing you will every hear.

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Videos after the jump

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