Gracenote Music Maps

Wicked cool tool:  Gracenote’s Music Map

Gracenote, the company that provides album information when you rip a CD, has decided to take their database of CD information served and tie it to a map of IP addresses.

Its kinda crude — you can zero in on a country or state, but nothing more specific.

What would make this tool really rock would be the ability to enter a zip code or even a street — all the better to make fun of what pop trash your neighbors are listening too!

Grace_note_music_map

The US and UK seemed to be dominated by Classic Rock. I wonder how much of that reflects new purchases, and how much is an iPod phenomena –people ripping their collections to iTunes to make their music mobile.

Australia had a similar emphasis on 60/70s rock, plus The Ministry of Sound. South Africa is a funny mix: U2 and the Beatles, RHCP and Celine Dion, Metallica and Avril Lavinge. Hmmm, kinda odd.

The lists from China, Korea, Japan were in the native languages, and so provided very little info for non native speakers.

India is a mix of native and US music that really surprised me: #1. Linkin Park #4. Bryan Adams, #7.  Backstreet Boys, #8. Pink Floyd, #10. The Beatles (I didn’t recognize the rest).

Saudia Arabia was Beatles, Mariah Carey, Rolling Stones, Bon Jovi, Aerosmith

Iraq, which had the Insane Clown Posse in the top 10, may be unduly being influenced by US Service personnel . . .

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via boingboing

Category: Digital Media, Music, Web/Tech

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Five Days of Misery

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Friday Night Jazz Film Soundtracks

Oh, goody, yet another list. How f$%&ing original!

For some silly reason, there seems to be all this hoo-haa about the silly Vanity Fair article on the top Movie Soundtracks of all time.

These people are wankers for many reasons: 1) The VF weenies press released to death; b) the article is not even available on line; iii) the editors chose Purple Rain as the greatest film soundtrack of all time.

I remain convinced that the purveyors of these annoying lists select a controversial top pick to generate buzz (tho’ you would think this would might encourage online posting).

Regardless, let’s not play into their hand. Rather than waste too much time telling you how clueless VF’s music editors are, or giving them any linklove, I would rather — in the spirit of Friday Night Jazz — compile a worthwhile list of films and soundtracks for your perusal.

A few ground rules:

• We are looking for outstanding soundtracks to outstanding films. (Merely o.k. doesn’t cut it).

• Groundbreaking films, soundtracks and performances get bonus points. (Mediocre performances get cut).

• Better non-film versions take points away from the movie soundtrack — where there are superior versions such as the Broadway soundtrack (i.e., Hair, Jesus Christ Superstar, etc.) than those flicks don ‘t make the cut.

• Pure adaptations of Broadway shows also get cut. In my mind, Cabaret, Chicago, Chorus Line are more filmed stage productions, rather than pure movies. (as forewarned, totally subjective).

Hence, several films that I love failed to make the cut: Apocalypse Now is fantastic in the way it uses music (especially The Doors’ The End, and Wagner’s The Ride Of The Valkyries), but its not great as a standalone soundtrack; the wonderful My Fair Lady, with Rex Harrison’s mediocre voice, and the dubbing of Audrey Hepburn’s voice, also doesn’t make the cut.

These things are totally subjective, and are rarely based exclusively on mere merits. Pink Floyd The Wall was a great album so overplayed when I was in
college, that I simply couldn’t pull the trigger on it (the film is a bit
ponderous to boot). Again, these things are very subjective.

Alternatively, the film can’t suck. The greatest
soundtrack in the world becomes irrelevant if its attached to a film
like, say, Hedwig and the Angry Inch — a play that sucked two hours out of my life that I will never get back, and will literally regret on my death bed.

We can certainly debate the order of any list, or the contents, and we probably will (thats what the comments are for).

Here’s my subjective top ~20:

1. A Hard Day’s Night:  A brilliant film and album that both remain as energetic and fresh today as they were in 1964. The Beatles personalities were perfectly suited to the medium, so much so that its hard to imagine a better film/soundtrack combo.

: A Hard Day's Night

A Hard Day’s Night

If you want to consider another Beatles sound track, both Yellow Submarine and Help! are fun — but neither rise to the sheer genius of A Hard Day’s Night. 

~~~

2. Stop Making Sense:
Quite simply, the best concert film ever made. Yes, some of you will
declare The Last Waltz, (with a few stragglers nominating Woodstock)
but there is simply nothing else that ha the combination of
showmanship, musical innovation — and the big suit — like this film
does. Marvelous.

: Stop Making Sense

Stop Making Sense

~~~

3.  Blade Runner: Forget the ponderous and boring Chariots of Fire, THIS is Vangelis Masterpiece. Not only is the music hauntingly beautiful, but it fits the filmscape so perfectly, making it even better than it originally was. We’ve already spilled so many words about BR, that the less said the better. "All those moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain." 

: Blade Runner

Blade Runner

~~~

4. The Rocky Horror Picture Show:
I could try to explain this, but I couldn’t do it justice. Find a
theater where this is playing at the midnight show, and go with someone
who’s gone before. Repeat.

: The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975 Film)

The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975 Film)

~~~

5. The Graduate:
Not only is this a seminal, groundbreaking film, but the soundtrack is
phenomenal. The way the various songs are interwoven into the action,
mood, psyches of the players is amazing (listen as Benjamin’s Alpha Romeo Spider runs out of gas).

I don’t know if Mike Nichols is
a genius, or just got incredibly lucky. Either way, its a great
soundtrack and a great movie.   

: The Graduate (1967 Film)

The Graduate (1967 Film)

~~~

6.  Harold and Maude:
One of the most subversive, outrageously amusing black comedies ever made — hysterically funny to boot. Cat Stevens (before he became Yusaf)
created a wonderful collection of songs that enhance the story line’s mood and emotions.  This is, quite bluntly, one of the
funniest films ever made.

: Harold and Maude

Harold and Maude

~~~

7. Garden State:
My "surprise" entry. A charming little film with a soundtrack that simply
refuses to stop delighting you with its lovely tunes and ballads, nearly all of which are by bands that
prior to this soundtrack were relatively unknown. This disc was played constantly in the car in 2004/05.

: Garden State

Garden State

~~~

8. (tie):Led Zeppelin, The Song Remains The Same
The Who, The Kids Are Alright:

Perhaps its my age showing, but I have always found each of these to be tremendous films and soundtracks. The Zep concert film was utterly ground breaking, and I must have seen it a zillion times after they broke up; The Who film was a fantastic documentary.

: The Song Remains The Same (Remastered / Expanded) (2CD)

The Song Remains The Same

: The Kids Are Alright

The Kids Are Alright

~~~

10. Fantasia: Music by Tchaikovsky, Moussorgsky, Stravinsky, Beethoven, Ponchielli, Bach, Dukas, and Schubert. ’nuff said.

The film was groundbreaking in many ways, including the innovative
use of animation and stereophonic sound — but its the overall approach
that has been so enduring:  Allow the Disney animators tointerpret Classical music. The results are both playful and surreal. Its amazing how well this has held up after 60 years . . .   

: Fantasia (Special 60th Anniversary Edition)

Fantasia (Special 60th Anniversary Edition)

~~~

11. Pulp Fiction: The film does so many things so well — but the way the music is integrated into the actual plot is simply terrific.  Plus, Travolta and Uma can each dance. 

: Pulp Fiction: Music From The Motion Picture

Pulp Fiction: Music From The Motion Picture

~~~

12. West Side Story:
Leonard Bernstein’s musical update of Romeo and Juliet. The combination
of Stephen Sondheim brilliant lyrics, the kinetic choreography and the
bravura camera work made for a fantastic wide screen film. The
soundtrack created the perfect counterpoint to the dance and action.

Sure, its a bit dated (hence, #10), but it remains an all time great.

: West Side Story

West Side Story

~~~

13.  Purple Rain: There is no doubt that the purple one can sign, dance, play guitar — but Acting? Not so much.

Regardless, his sheer overwhelming talent is why this manages to get onto my top 15.

True Story: I saw this in the theaters in college, and my remark was "He’s going to be bigger than Michael Jackson" — who was huge at the time.

Its a toss up how right that call was, but the general concept was dead on . . .

: Music from the Motion Picture "Purple Rain"

Music from the Motion Picture "Purple Rain"

~~~

14. Little Shop Of Horrors: A fantabulous musical/horror/comedy. It’s all a whole lot of fun, and the musical styles range from honky-tonk to doo-wop to straightforward rock n’ roll. The strength of the film carries what otherwise might have been a mere Broadway adaption into an entire different level.
 

: Little Shop Of Horrors (1986 Film)

Little Shop Of Horrors (1986 Film)

~~~

15. Koyaanisqatsi: A quasi-documentary, this film has been described as "visual concert of images" or a "filmic landscape." The reason its here is the hauntingly beautiful music of Phillip Glass. A classic college flick . . .

: Koyaanisqatsi - Life Out of Balance

Koyaanisqatsi – Life Out of Balance

~~~

16. Saturday Night Fever: One of those seminal films that tremendously influenced the culture.

My choice in music was rock-n-roll, and I had little interest in blow-dried hair, white polyester suits, or cruising discos looking to pick Staten Island bimbos.

The music works as well on its own, but it also works as a classic piece of pop history. (And John Travolta makes the list twice!)

: Saturday Night Fever: The Original Movie Sound Track

Saturday Night Fever: The Original Movie Sound Track

~~~

17. The Tao of Steve: Another charming little film that surprises with its wonderful songs. A fun amusing, philosophically oriented film, with a soundtrack to match. For you Outdoor Types.
   

: The Tao of Steve: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack

The Tao of Steve: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack

~~~

18. All That Jazz: The Oscar winning soundtrack by Ralph Burns includes jazz, classical, pop, and Broadway standards. Its a marvelous mix that works to great effect in the film.

Can you imagine anyone other Director making so self-critical autobiographical film other than Bob Fosse? While some have criticized the film as a  rip-off of Fellini’s 8 1/2, my favored descriptions of All That Jazz is "the musical version of Apocalypse Now." If you can imagine that, you have a better sense of what the film itself is like.

: All That Jazz (1979 Film)
All that work. All that glitter. All that pain. All that love. All that crazy rhythm. All that jazz.

All That Jazz (1979 Film)

~~~

19. The Big Chill:
The Motown dominated score was one of the most artistically skillful –
and commercially successful — uses of pop ever set to a film.

More than merely setting a time and place, the soundtrack has a
wispy nostalgia for a prior period in the players’ lives. Subsequent
attempts by other movies have been less successful of creating a look
back from a specific time to another one;  e.g., I think of the Forrest
Gump soundtrack as Big Chill 2.

: The Big Chill - Deluxe Edition

The Big Chill – Deluxe Edition

~~~

 

20.  South Park – Bigger, Longer & Uncut: You will laugh until you piss yourself. This one squeaks in at #20 because the soundtrack is so very, very funny. 

: South Park - Bigger, Longer & Uncut

South Park – Bigger, Longer & Uncut

~~~

Thats my top list; A few Honorable Mentions are after the jump . . .

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Category: Digital Media, Film, Friday Night Jazz, Music

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Category: Credit, Currency, Federal Reserve, Finance

Results: Big Picture Reader Survey

As promised, here are the results of the survey we did on Monday.

Thank you again to everyone who participated in this survey: Over 2000 of you responded, and the results are quite intriguing. Kudos to Survey Gizmo for putting together a nice product — very simple and easy to use. (I am sure I could have done a better job if I actually read the instructions)

In many cases, I did not show the full set of answers — too many one offs to fit neatly on a web page . . .  but where possible, I gave the top few answers, down to ~1%.

When someone asked me "Who are your readers," I could only answer in the most general of terms. Michelle over at Footnoted suggested doing a survey, and hence, here we are.

~~~

This was quite an interesting experiment; Please feel free to make suggestions for other ideas/questions/quiz ideas/concepts in the comments.   

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Long ass page continues after the jump . .  .

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Oil at $96, Gold at $800 (Fed belatedly worried about inflation)

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