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ecommerce

 


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Consumer Psychology and ECommerce Checkouts Infographic
via Voucher Cloud

Category: Consumer Spending, Digital Media, Psychology

Please use the comments to demonstrate your own ignorance, unfamiliarity with empirical data and lack of respect for scientific knowledge. Be sure to create straw men and argue against things I have neither said nor implied. If you could repeat previously discredited memes or steer the conversation into irrelevant, off topic discussions, it would be appreciated. Lastly, kindly forgo all civility in your discourse . . . you are, after all, anonymous.

5 Responses to “Consumer Psychology & eCommerce”

  1. Iamthe50percent says:

    Another annoyance is “low low price, price visible at checkout”. I’m surprised that is not a major reason for abandonment.

    Good guidelines, someone should forward this to Kathleen Sibelius.

  2. GeorgeBurnsWasRight says:

    I’d love to know how they record an “abandonment”.

    I don’t buy a lot on line, but when I do I do price comparisons. Some websites don’t disclose their S/H fees until you get into the checkout process. In those cases, my abandonment is because I needed info to make a decision.

    In addition, some websites I use don’t have wish lists, but do save your shopping cart for a long time. I’ll go into the shopping cart several times over a period of days or even weeks as I put together an order which will minimize S/H.

    As for the many who abandon a site after a 3-second wait, they’re either completely impulse buyers or else people with a really inflated view of the value of their time.

  3. david_12321 says:

    Recently I was shopping for a $5 repair part for my dishwasher. The first place I shopped had $18 for the lowest priced shipping option that you did not find out until after several screens of inputting information for purchase. The place I purchased it from provided estimated shipping after you put it in the cart if you gave your zip.

  4. denim says:

    Good info on how “little” things turn off people buying anything at a website … in a matter of seconds:

    http://www.ritholtz.com/blog/2013/11/consumer-psychology-ecommerce/

    submitted to the whitehouse at

    http://www.whitehouse.gov/contact/submit-questions-and-comments